Philosophy

A word from the founder:

I am currently earning my master’s degree to become a cognitive and affective psychologist. I am serving as the clinical research lab supervisor at UWO and I worked in the past as an applied behavioral technician with children on the spectrum including center-based treatment. More importantly, autism spectrum is a part of my family and I personally have scored above average on the Autism Quotient. I am founding the center with the vision that autism spectrum is not always disabling and never has to be in all regards, and that encouraging children to pursue their passions and own unique learning styles are keys sometimes missing from current autism paradigms. Celebrate Neurodiversity! encourages individuality. Although we will work with parents to develop specific learning targets for each child, we generally promote using cognitive strategies to reason with, listen to, and develop the child’s rationality. Behaviorism will be used as the backbone to our daily operations with every worker being trained in behaviorist fundamentals, but sometimes a child asks why and we encourage that. The best mental nourishment comes in both behaviorist and cognitive strategies.

I also have advanced education in the neuropsychology of autism. Celebrate Neurodiversity! does not endorse the disease model of autism in which a “cure” is sought. Autistic children need healthy coping mechanisms and reinforcement for appropriate behaviors. Most adults living with autism are functional members of society who do not wish to be coddled. The center believes in the children to develop necessary life skills, albeit possibly at a different rate than neurotypical peers. The best thing we can do for children on the spectrum is hold healthy expectations for them.

I truly hope to be a resource to parents, children and adults living with autism, and I am excited to offer classes for parents which will tackle a wide variety of subjects such as the vaccine debate, dieting, sensory overload, seizures, behaviorism, the cognitive revolution and many more.

Sincerely,

Rebecca Timmins

Publications and Poster Presentations:

  • Berger, J., Bowe, K., Timmins, R., & Karst, A. (2016, May). Attentional Localization, Selection and the N2pc. 2016 UW Oshkosh Psychology Department Research Symposium and 2016 Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA.
  • McCann, L. I., R. R. Timmins, & Ebert, A. R.  (2016, April).  Introductory Psychology in Teaching of Psychology: Topic changes over forty-two years. Celebration of Scholarship at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI.
  • McCann, L. I., Ebert, A. R., & Timmins, R. R.  (2015, April).  Author numbers and genders over forty years in Teaching of Psychology.  Celebration of Scholarship at University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI.
  • McCann, L. I., Ebert, A. R., & Timmins, R. R.  (2015, January).  Author numbers and genders over forty years in Teaching of Psychology. 37th Annual National Institute on the Teaching of Psychology.  St. Petersburg, FL.
  • McCann, L., Ebert, A. R., & Timmins, R. (Accepted January, 2016). Author numbers and genders over forty years in Teaching of Psychology. Journal: Teaching of Psychology.
  • Mohawk, K., Timmins, R., & Conway, S., & Lishner, D. (2018, April). The effect of infant-like characteristics on empathic concern III: An examination of replication variability across seven direct replication studies. 2018 Celebration of Scholarship, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI.
  • Waraxa, A., Malcore, M., Thompson, T., Timmins, R., Schroeder, M., & Hong, P. (2018, April). The effects of mindfulness on helping children. 2018 Celebration of Scholarship, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI.
  • Timmins, R., & Karst, A. (2019, April). Examining the relationship between autistic traits and mirror neuron integrity. 2019 Thesis Proposal and Celebration of Scholarship, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI.